npm package discovery and stats viewer.

Discover Tips

  • General search

    [free text search, go nuts!]

  • Package details

    pkg:[package-name]

  • User packages

    @[username]

Sponsor

Optimize Toolset

I’ve always been into building performant and accessible sites, but lately I’ve been taking it extremely seriously. So much so that I’ve been building a tool to help me optimize and monitor the sites that I build to make sure that I’m making an attempt to offer the best experience to those who visit them. If you’re into performant, accessible and SEO friendly sites, you might like it too! You can check it out at Optimize Toolset.

About

Hi, 👋, I’m Ryan Hefner  and I built this site for me, and you! The goal of this site was to provide an easy way for me to check the stats on my npm packages, both for prioritizing issues and updates, and to give me a little kick in the pants to keep up on stuff.

As I was building it, I realized that I was actually using the tool to build the tool, and figured I might as well put this out there and hopefully others will find it to be a fast and useful way to search and browse npm packages as I have.

If you’re interested in other things I’m working on, follow me on Twitter or check out the open source projects I’ve been publishing on GitHub.

I am also working on a Twitter bot for this site to tweet the most popular, newest, random packages from npm. Please follow that account now and it will start sending out packages soon–ish.

Open Software & Tools

This site wouldn’t be possible without the immense generosity and tireless efforts from the people who make contributions to the world and share their work via open source initiatives. Thank you 🙏

© 2022 – Pkg Stats / Ryan Hefner

@financial-times/x-interaction

v8.0.1

Published

This module enables you to write x-dash components that respond to events and change their own data.

Downloads

2,378

Readme

x-interaction

This module enables you to write x-dash components that respond to events and change their own data.

Installation

This module is supported on Node 12 and is distributed on npm.

npm install --save @financial-times/x-interaction

x-interaction is intended to be used internally in x-dash components, instead of as a dependency of your application.

Writing interactive components

The main interface of x-interaction is the function withActions, which can be used to wrap ordinary (i.e. stateless) x-dash components.

Actions

An action is a function that's passed to a component, intended to be used in an event handler. Each action returns a state update, which can be either an object to be merged into the properties of the component, or a function that's called with the current properties and should return an object to be merged in:

import {withActions} from '@financial-times/x-interaction';

const greetingActions = withActions({
	actionOne() {
		return {greeting: "world"};
	},

	actionTwo() {
		return ({greeting}) => ({
			greeting: greeting.toUpperCase(),
		});
	},
});

const Greeting = greetingActions(({greeting, actions}) => <div>
	hello {greeting}
	<button onClick={actions.actionOne}>"world"</button>
	<button onClick={actions.actionTwo}>uppercase</button>
</div>);

Clicking the first button will set the greeting to "world", and clicking the second button sets the greeting to whatever it was previously, in uppercase. Returning a function from your action is the only way to have the updated state depend on the previous state.

Asynchronous actions

If an action returns a Promise (e.g. if it's an async function), x-interaction will wait for the promise and use the value it resolves to as the state update, and set the property isLoading to true while the promise is in-flight:

import {withActions} from '@financial-times/x-interaction';

const greetingActions = withActions({
	async updateGreeting() {
		const repsonse = await fetch('/greeting');
		const {greeting} = await response.json();
		return {greeting};
	},
});

const Greeting = greetingActions(({greeting, actions, isLoading}) => <div>
	hello {greeting}
	<button onClick={actions.updateGreeting} disabled={isLoading}>
		{isLoading ? 'loading greeting...' : 'update greeting'}
	</button>
</div>);

Properties in actions

If you need access to the properties of the component before returning the state update, for example if your component needs to send parameters to an endpoint, you can pass a function to withActions in place of the actions object. Your function will be called with the initial properties of the component, and should return an actions object:

import {withActions} from '@financial-times/x-interaction';

const greetingActions = withActions(({lang}) => ({
	async updateGreeting() {
		const repsonse = await fetch(`/greeting?lang=${lang}`);
		const {greeting} = await response.json();
		return {greeting};
	},
}));

const Greeting = greetingActions(({greeting, actions, isLoading}) => <div>
	hello {greeting}
	<button onClick={actions.updateGreeting} disabled={isLoading}>
		{isLoading ? 'loading greeting...' : 'update greeting'}
	</button>
</div>);

These properties will not change when the state updates, so they should not be used to have state that depends on previous state; use a state update function for this.

Wrapped and unwrapped components

Because the actions are separate from the components, the base component can usually be used as a static component without the wrapper. This is useful in case a consumer of the component needs to provide its own actions. It's recommended to export the wrapped component, the base component, and the actions as separate named exports. The naming convention for these is ComponentName, BaseComponentName and componentNameActions, for example:

import {withActions} from '@financial-times/x-interaction';

export const greetingActions = withActions({});

export const BaseGreeting = ({greeting, actions}) => <div>
	hello {greeting}
</div>;

export const Greeting = greetingActions(BaseGreeting);

Hydrating server-rendered markup

Hydration: a technique in which client-side JavaScript converts a static HTML web page done by server-side rendering, into a dynamic web page by attaching event handlers to the HTML elements.

When you have an x-interaction component rendered by the server, and you want to attach the client-side version of the component to handle the actions, rather than rendering the component manually (which might become unwieldy, especially if you have many components & instances on the page), you can have x-interaction manage it for you.

There are three parts to this: registering the component, serialising and hydrating.

Registering the component

To register the component you'll need to call x-interaction's registerComponent function, providing the component and its name as arguments.

import {withActions, registerComponent} from '@financial-times/x-interaction';

const greetingActions = withActions({
	actionOne() {
		return {greeting: "world"};
	},

	actionTwo() {
		return ({greeting}) => ({
			greeting: greeting.toUpperCase(),
		});
	},
});

const Greeting = greetingActions(({greeting, actions}) => <div>
	hello {greeting}
	<button onClick={actions.actionOne}>"world"</button>
	<button onClick={actions.actionTwo}>uppercase</button>
</div>);

registerComponent(Greeting, 'Greeting')

Serialising

To ensure components are rendered with the same initial data on the client side, and keep track of all the instances that are rendered and their identifiers, x-interaction exports a Serialiser class. You must create a new instance at the start every HTTP request that responds with any number of x-interaction components.

This instance should be passed to every x-interaction component you render, as a property called serialiser. This will add the component's properties to the data to be sent to the client (the "hydration data").

Finally, after every x-interaction component is rendered, you should output the hydration data. x-interaction exports a HydrationData component, which takes a serialiser as a property and renders a <script> tag containing its hydration data, assigned to a global variable that can be picked up by the x-interaction client-side runtime. A serialiser cannot be used again after its data has been output by a HydrationData component.

Here's a full example of using Serialiser and HydrationData using the Greeting component we registered in the previous step.

import express from 'express';
import { Greeting } from './Greeting'
import { Serialiser, HydrationData } from '@financial-times/x-interaction';

const app = express();

app.get('/', (req, res) => {
	const serialiser = new Serialiser();

	res.send(`
		${Greeting({ serialiser })}
		${HydrationData({ serialiser })}
	`);
});

Hydrating

When rendered on the server side, components output an extra wrapper element, with a data-x-dash-id attribute. This is used by the x-interaction runtime to identify the component in serialisation data, and attach the correct instance to it on the client side. You can pass this in as the id property when rendering the component; otherwise, an identifier will be randomly generated.

x-interaction exports a function hydrate. This should be called on the client side. It inspects the global serialisation data on the page, uses the identifiers to find the wrapper elements, and calls render from your chosen x-engine client-side runtime to render component instances into the wrappers.

Before calling hydrate, you must first import any x-interaction components that will be rendered on the page. The components register themselves with the x-interaction runtime when imported; you don't need to do anything with the imported component. This will also ensure the component is included in your client-side bundle. Similarly if the component that you're server side rendering is just a component that you've created through withActions, make sure you import that component along with its registerComponent invokation.

Because hydrate expects the wrappers to be present in the DOM when called, it should be called after DOMContentLoaded. Depending on your page structure, it might be appropriate to hydrate the component when it's scrolled into view.

A full example of client-side code for hydrating components:

import { hydrate } from '@financial-times/x-interaction';
import '@financial-times/x-increment'; // bundle x-increment and register it with x-interaction

document.addEventListener('DOMContentLoaded', hydrate);

Triggering actions externally

Client-side rendering

When using a client-side runtime, such as React, to render an x-interaction component, you can pass a property actionsRef to the component. This should be a function which will be called with a reference to the component instance's actions when the component is mounted, and null when it's unmounted. This is similar to React's ref property for obtaining references to DOM elements.

You can call these action references from anywhere in your app, and they'll be scoped to the component instance you obtained the reference from. This allows external events, such as from components not in x-dash, or third-party components you don't control, to trigger state changes in your component. You can also use this functionality to trigger initialisation logic on a component, for example when it is scrolled into view.

Here's an example of triggering an x-increment component's increment action from a button outside the component:

import { h, Component } from '@financial-times/x-engine';
import { Increment } from '@financial-times/x-increment';

class ExternalActionDemo extends Component {
	render() {
		return <div>
			<button onClick={() => this.incrementActions && this.incrementActions.increment()}>
				Increment externally
			</button>

			<Increment count={1} actionsRef={actions => this.incrementActions = actions} />
		</div>;
	}
}

Server-side rendering

When your component has been rendered by x-interaction client-side hydration, you don't have access to the component instance, so you can't use actionsRef. In this scenario, x-interaction supports triggering actions via a DOM Custom Event.

The event is called x-interaction.trigger-action, and should be dispatched on the wrapper element of the component instance you want to trigger an action on. The wrapper has the attribute data-x-dash-id, which you can use in a selector, but because the randomly-generated default id is unpredictable, you should render the component with a unique, static id. On the server side:

res.send(`
	${Increment({count: 1, id: 'x-interaction-1'})}
	${getInteractionData()}
`);

And the client side:

const wrapper = document.querySelector('[data-x-dash-id="x-interaction-1"]');

In the detail parameter of the event, include a property action, which is the name of the action to trigger. You can also specify a property args, which should be an array that will be passed to the action as its arguments:

wrapper.dispatchEvent(
	new CustomEvent(
		'x-interaction.trigger-action',
		{ detail: { action: 'increment', args: [ { amount: 5 } ] } }
	)
);